Why do people who whistle or hum all day always seem to be happy?

Here’s a question. Why do people who whistle or hum all day always seem to be happy?

Well, people who whistle or hum all day may seem irritating but they are actually toning their vagus nerve and putting their body into a relaxed parasympathetic state. And that’s exactly why they always seem to be happy!

I always encourage clients to do some singing, humming, because this not only exercises the voice but sends these vibrations through the body, toning the vagus nerve and helping us feel physically and emotionally relaxed.

One of the exercises I use is to hum along to a favorite song or a “warm up for singers” such as the one I’ve put at the end of this post. Just a couple of minutes singing or humming while doing other things about the home can make a significant difference to how you feel for the rest of the day. Happy Woman

Recently I have added another dimension to this simple exercise by connecting one’s awareness to the multitude of vibrations singing or humming brings to the body. The idea is that by adding an extra dimension to this valuable vocal exercise will help bring very real and positive change to how we feel physically and emotionally for the rest of the day.

 And all with a minimal amount of effort.

So to experience this begin by humming or singing with your fingers gently cupped around your ears. You will notice how the head is vibrating with the resonance of the voice.

Now place your fingers gently over your scalp and also become aware of the skull and the brain vibrating.

Try the jaw, the collarbone, the chest, the throat. In fact have a bit of fun experimenting with different parts of the body as you discover how relaxing and effective this is.

Not only will you be improving your mood but the vibrations from the vocal chords will be vibrating the whole physical body. These vibrations will be “massaging” the organs in the body, the muscles round the lips, the brain  and even the bones of the skull. They will be increasing blood flow, relaxing the voice and making a myriad of other significant changes in your body.

We can’t “make these changes happen” but they will happen automatically as all parts of the system share these positive messages and feelings with each other.

Having done that you may well notice how much more resonant your own voice has become and how that resonance gives you an extra boost of relaxation and confidence. You have connected billions of neural connections just by singing or humming!

If we try doing this by thinking about it we will soon discover that it is virtually impossible to MAKE these changes happen. But when the body and mind work naturally together they know exactly what to do.

This way we can get on with our daily lives as we continue to add real value to our daily experiences.

Telling yourself to BE HAPPY doesn’t really work so why not “Sing Yourself” there!

For more information about my online international therapy and one to one work in Glasgow, Scotland please email rogerfoxwell.therapy@gmail.com   or visit www.rogerfoxwell.co.uk

Singers warm up

 

Hypnosis for Anger

Hypnosis for anger

Can hypnotherapy help someone with anger issues?

Hypnosis is an ideal tool for helping clients with anger issues. Although anger is a natural human emotion if it gets out of control it can have severe and devastating effects on our health, relationships, self esteem and even our employment prospects.

Once the rush of brain chemicals takes over and the “red mist” descends it can be impossible to step back and take stock of a situation in any reasonable manner.

However if we can find strategies and techniques to help guide our body and mind back to more balanced feelings then it is possible to dissipate these negative feelings. This will then help lead us away from situations that at best could be very uncomfortable and at worst cause us a lot more trouble than we could imagine.

Using hypnosis to learn how to interrupt those old patterns will really help you control those negative emotions and save you from spinning out of control.

Mental Health, let’s talk about it!

Mental Health

Talk about mental health with Time to Talk

On Thursday this week (February 4th 2016) it will be “Time To Talk” day.  Time To Talk day has been organised for the last three years by charities Mind, and Rethink Mental Illness under the umbrella Time To Change and the aim is to encourage people to share their feelings and discuss their stories and personal experiences about mental health in person and via Facebook and Twitter.

Although this is primarily a project that has been been organised in England over the last three years, in Scotland, England and Wales one in four people will suffer from some sort of mental health issue and encouraging people to talk about it can only help break down the taboos and difficulties around discussing mental illness.

For various reasons people find it hard to talk openly about mental illness so engaging everyone helps bring into the open a subject that has been in need of more awareness and understanding for a long time now. It is really much more common than we think and this initiative can only help and encourage a greater understanding and support for anyone going through difficult times. Knowing that you are not alone is invaluable in helping support the healing process.

According to a Time to Change survey 60% of those interviewed found the stigma and discrimination around issues such as depression, anorexia and anxiety were as debilitating as the symptoms they were suffering. If we have a physical illness we are much less likely to keep it to ourselves than a mental one because of the stigma surrounding mental illness.

Talking with friends and family is a great therapy but there is a point when one needs to take the next step and that is of course seeing your GP, and or appropriate professional organisation who will be able to help you get the best treatment. 

The three charities below are a good place to start if you or someone you know is having difficulty in getting the support and advice they need.

For more about Time To Talk day follow this link

Time to Talk

See me Scotland  is a Scottish charity also with the aim of ending mental health stigma and discrimination and for Wales follow the link below for  more information 

Time to Change Wales

Brief History of Hypnosis

Brief History of Hypnosis

Hypnosis – a brief history

The history of hypnosis dates way back to at least Egyptian times. Early records show that the Egyptians would have a temple where someone with a particular ailment would take certain herbs and be given a form of hypnotic chanting to put them into a trance or sleep state. Once in this state the client would sleep after the ceremony and would dream of a cure to their illness.

Also in ancient Greece specific “Sleep Temples” were built to help people in much the same way and give them the opportunity to dream of a cure. The interesting thing here is that the idea that we can dream of something to find an answer to a problem is really not at all far fetched and in a state of trance it is often surprising how things long forgotten or seemingly random thoughts and ideas can just seem to “pop” into the mind when we are in a hypnotic or trance like state.

We have all heard the phrase “being mesmerised” and this comes from the eighteenth century physician Franz Anton Mesmer who hypnotised his patients using what he termed “Animal Magnetism” by having his patients sit in a tub fitted with iron rods holding hands and thereby seeming to promote this strange energy.

Mesmerism became very popular for a while and later appeared in India in the nineteenth century when the Sottish surgeon James Esdaile witnessed some amazing operations performed with no anesthetic. Esdaile continued studying this technique and became known in his time as the leading expert in pain free surgery.

Another nineteenth century Scottish surgeon James Braid also witnessed this technique called mesmerism but decided eventually to use the term hypnosis and was the first to bring hypnosis closer to the form that we recognise today.

Later that century Sigmund Freud had been studying with one of the flourishing French schools of hypnosis and decided to use it in his practice although he soon gave it up as he developed his own form of psychoanalysis. Interestingly this new “psychoanalysis” became the mainstream form of treatment for emotional disorders and hypnosis was side-lined as an Academic study. It is argued that but for this hypnosis would have become even more mainstream than it is today.

Hypnosis has often been seen as a directed form of communication until the twentieth century when the father of modern hypnosis Milton Erickson developed his own innovative techniques and language patterns that helped the patient in effect make their own unconscious decisions and choices. Erickson first used hypnosis on himself to help relieve his pain and discomfort from polio and much of his work and techniques still form a strong basis for the study that hypnotherapists have today.

The work of such experts as Erickson, Elman, and the co-founders of NLP Richard Bandler and John Grinder and many others has helped bring hypnosis into the twenty first century as a respected and powerful modality. Modern hypnotherapy is now recognised as an extremely effective modality to help resolve a wide range of issues.